Since adopting the Zero Waste lifestyle, my life and that of my family has completely changed, for the better. We not only feel happier, we lead more meaningful lives, based on experiences instead of stuff.
Today, my goal is to shatter pre-conceptions associated with the Zero Waste lifestyle and share what we have discovered about its incredible health, financial and time saving benefits. 

Pâté Recipe

Boy was my lunch delicious today. So good that I thought the recipe deserved getting shared with the world for others to enjoy. Looks like Nutella doesn't it? Well it's chicken liver pâté

Pâté is one of those things that until a few years ago, I was convinced had to be purchased in order to be enjoyed.

Well, I found that it is not true. The recipe is so simple, affordable and quick to make that it is a perfect picnic dish and cocktail appetizer.



Ingredients
Please refer below for more information on the origin of my ingredients

1 stick butter
1 lb. chicken liver
Couple rosemary sprigs
1 bay leaf
1/4 cup white wine or 2 tbsp. brandy (preferred)
Salt and pepper



Melt a 1/4 stick of butter in a large skillet


Add chicken livers and herbs and saute until thoroughly cooked (pink inside - 5 minutes)
Add a splash of white wine or brandy to deglaze 


Compost bay leaf, set aside rosemary sprigs, and blend chicken livers with the remaining butter 
and 3 tbsp wine or 1 tbsp brandy.

Season to taste, garnish with the rosemary sprig and voila!


Enjoy with baguette and cornichon (optional: a green salad).

How Zero Waste are my ingredients?

Butter: As mentioned before, I stopped making butter because of cost, and butter remains the only food that we purchase in disposable packaging. The box goes into the recycling; the wrappers get washed and added to my collection for a planned art piece. Looking at three years worth of wrappers... I realize how important butter is to this family ;)

Chicken liver: The meat counter at Whole Foods put them in my jar. Chicken liver is a discard of the meat industry and am happy to take it off its hands for a super low price!  (I bought two pounds that day, as seen in picture above)

Rosemary: As mentioned before, we do not have a vegetable garden due to the nature of our property (we are perched on an oak-covered hill). We do grow a few things on our deck, but not rosemary. I consider the wild my vegetable garden. So when I need rosemary, I take the dog for a walk and forage.

Bay leaf: California bay trees grow like weeds in our neck of the woods. They have even become invasive. Since they carry the sudden oak death disease, we have cut the ones that keep sprouting on our property. When I need a leaf for cooking, I pick the neighbour's branch that leans over our property (convenient foraging).

White wine: I have to say this recipe is good made with white wine, but fantastic made with brandy. I made this batch of pâté using wine from a local winery, Le Neebia, that refills our bottles.

Salt and pepper: I purchased fine sea salt and whole peppercorn from the bulk bins at the grocery store, using my cloth bags.

Cornichons: I fill a small jar at the olive bar of the grocery store.

What are you eating for lunch?





48 comments:

  1. Anonymous11/29/2012

    I am definitely trying this in January!! I tried going pescetarian this year but will no longer continue after January. Turns out there are some meat dishes I can't live without for the rest of my life sadly. I'm gong to go back to eating meat only on the weekends and special occasions.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment anonymous!
      For lent last year I too became a pescatarian. I unfortunately quickly realized that eating fish on a daily basis is not an option as it once was. Too much mercury to worry about.
      In general I have a vegetarian lunch (we still only have one meat dinner a week) but for some reason I had an extra jar to fill on my last grocery run and craved chicken liver when I saw them (had pictures of my pate in head). No matter how hard I try, I cannot deny my natural meat/high protein cravings at times -often right before a cycle ;) but we have greatly reduced our overall consumption and to us, that's what matters.

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  2. Rachel W.11/29/2012

    Chicken livers are a discard? Really? I know so many people who eat chicken livers. The stores where I live have pounds of chicken livers packaged and displayed for sale. Then again, many of the stores also sell the gizzards and hearts (yum!) so maybe it depends on where you live.

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    Replies
    1. You're right, poor choice of word. But I don't think you can argue that (in the US) they are as valued as other meat parts (e.g, breasts)... If they were the price would be much different. Am I wrong?

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    2. Rachel W.11/30/2012

      Not saying you're wrong. I was just surprised to hear chicken liver referred to as discards. I was raised and still live in an area where people regularly eat the "discard" pieces of meat. I guess that's why it surprised me.

      Delete
  3. I really enjoyed your approach to recipe-story-telling. Thank you!

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  4. Thanks family will love this for Christmas!

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  5. Camille11/30/2012

    Hello!

    Sorry my comment isn't really related to that post, but I just discovered something quite upsetting : in Quebec, it's illegal to sell food in bulk... some shops do it anyway in Montreal, but there isn't a lot of them obviously. :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Camille: There are many places that offer bulk beyond Montreal. I am happy to say that my bulk locator app (now in testing stages) will include Canada. But in the meantime please refer to this map for bulk in Quebec. Happy bulk shopping!
      http://batchgeo.com/map/c8b30e0cf99391f12718437c58ba4ae2

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    2. Anonymous11/30/2012

      Camille, isn't there any BulkBarn in your area? We have some in Moncton, NB. Some grocery store also have a few products in bulk. Sadly most of the bulk product are more expensive the buying in store.

      Linda S

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    3. Camille12/05/2012

      Thank you really much for the map, I'll look into it! Anonymous, I saw that there was 4 BulkBarn in Quebec (not in my area but still, they exist!)... but the weird thing is that when I went to my local "healthy store" (ok sorry for my English), they said the legislation in Quebec was recently changed and that the bulk sales were not allowed anymore...

      That being said, maybe they weren't right... I searched about it on governement websites and found nothing...

      Anyway, thank you for all your infos :)

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  6. Anonymous11/30/2012

    I had no idea it was so simple to make pate. I will check out my local butcher counter for the chicken livers so that I can make a batch. Have you tried freezing it? I wonder if it would change the consistency.

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  7. Anonymous11/30/2012

    Homemade Nutella
    makes for 3 jars


    200 g Hazelnuts
    1 can Condensed Milk
    255 g Chocolate - the darker the better
    1/2 cup hot Milk


    Roast the hazelnuts for about 10-15 minutes either in the oven or in a dry pan over the heat.



    When the nuts are ready put them on a tray or a magazine and let them cool down a little.
    Once they are not hot anymore, place them in the food processor and start processing them.



    It will be quite a while, if you don't have a very professional machine, like me. The hazelnuts will become Hazelnut butter and will look like this.

    When you're done with this, start bringing water to a boil. Place a big bowl over the water and melt the chocolate.

    When the chocolate has melted, pour the condensed milk in.

    Mix them together.

    Love the chocolate swirls :) Then get ready to add the mixture to the hazelnut butter and process it some more. Add the hot milk if you find it too dense, I did. But if you like it thick, then you can leave the milk out.

    When it is creamy enough, Nutella has been created! Congrats! Brace yourself for some battle with yourself, it will be VERY hard not to eat a lot :)






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  8. Anonymous11/30/2012

    Do you think it would work to replace the butter with coconut oil (or another healthy oil) for those of us that are dairy allergic?

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  9. Dear Bea,

    Don't wash the wrappers until you get one more use out of them! After the stick of butter is used, fold the wrapper in half or quarters & put in fridge to use whenever you need to grease or oil a pan for baking or sauteing--just take out a wrapper (or 2 or 3...), smear it in muffin tins or cake pans or skillet using the wrapper as an "applicator". My mother used to use a small piece of wax paper as an applicator for crisco when greasing cake pans--this reminds me of that but is easier & less wasteful. After u have used them for this purpose & gotten every last schmear of butter, THEN wash them for future "artifying"! Hope this is useful! I love your blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Funny you mention that Elila. I wrote that on my post when I first drafted it and then deleted it, thinking TMI. Doesn't everyone do that with their wrappers?

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    2. Bea,
      Gosh I hope so! If not, maybe others will see these comments & have the "aha!" moment!

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    3. Are the wrappers not compostable?

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    4. Anonymous12/02/2012

      Evilforestgnome, I was thinking the same thing. I compost my butter wrappers. They are the light-wax papery type. As long as the papers aren't "plasticized" or foiled, I believe you can compost them.

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    5. Yes. When you are done reusing them, they can indeed be composted.

      Delete
    6. My husband introduced me to the idea of using butter wrappers for greasing pans. His mom grew up on a farm in the Depression in North Dakota and this was one of their many frugal tricks. However, I find that if I unwrap a stick of butter fresh from the fridge, there really isn't anything left on it for that purpose. But if I am baking and leaving the butter out to come to room temp then it does leave some good stuff behind. I don't need to grease many pans, so I keep my wrappers in a little bag in the freezer where they keep for ages.

      As for them being compostable -- really? I didn't know that. I usually buy Organic Valley butter (which recently changed their boxes to unwaxed, easily recyclable cardboard -- yeah!). Can anyone tell me if those wrappers are truly compostable? Thanks!

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    7. Anonymous12/17/2012

      Reusing butter wrappers to grease things = brilliant! So simple and yet I never thought of doing this myself. Ditto for composting them. Thanks for the tip.

      Delete
  10. My local Whole Foods (San Diego Hillcrest location 619.294.2800) refuses to let you bring in any containers that weigh more than .25lbs. How rude and unsustainable is that? I wrote to them and never heard back. I also contacted Sprouts market that allows no containers from home even though they have bulk. I just moved here and have no idea where to shop. (I used to live in Davis that had fantastic co-op that allowed me to put anything in my bags). Help!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I use my own cloth bags for bulk at sprouts with no problem. However, I have not bought any meat there so I can't comment on that. BTW, I never asked....I just bring my bags and fill up at the bulk area. :)

      Delete
    2. As mentioned before, when you run into such problem, please ask for a health code reference. Many people working in stores will turn you down to make you go away because they do not want to bother looking into it. I was recently turned down at a store where I have shopped with jars for the past 4 years simply because the person I dealt with that day did not know that jars are acceptable.

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    3. Anonymous12/03/2012

      I find the people working at Sprouts near me are unfamiliar with using glass containers from home for meat, but willing to do it. However, if I look away, they often put the sticker on a plastic bag, thus defeating the purpose, even when I've asked that it go strait on my container!! Since I buy meat rarely, a regularly re-used sticker is impractical for me, but I'm finding that being highly attentive, persistent and upbeat seems to get the desired result, but not without a bit of anxious persperation on my part.

      Delete
    4. I don't know if this would be too far for you (if you live in Hillcrest), but there is a wonderful co-op in OB (Ocean Beach People's Organic Food Co-op-- 619.224.1387) that is completely accepting of all types of jars and reusable containers (they don't even blink an eye when we weigh our jars). I have been up to Davis and absolutely love the co-op up there; I hope you find the co-op in San Diego just as fantastic!

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    5. I definitely would go to the ocean beach people's co-op. I sew my own bulk bags and bring them there, but have also brought heavy jars (I currently don't do that anymore due to using a scooter to transport groceries) and had them tare them. I don't buy bulk at sprouts since they have no organic and I choose to eat only organic. OB is also cheaper, which is sad since it's organic. It costs $15 a year to become a member or you pay 10% more than their advertised in store price (It's better to become a member).

      Bea, Butter is soooo expensive to make. I just made a little less than a lb yesterday and it was about $18. Unfortunately, I have milk goats and get the yummy milk from them, but would need a cream separator in order to make butter with the milk. I have to buy from a dairy that comes to the farmers market with glass jars of cream, and they still have the stupid plastic tops. Why can't they use mason like I do with my goat milk?

      Delete
    6. My WholeFoods has the same rule. I just take a smaller jar now. It is pretty silly...

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    7. Anonymous12/06/2012

      You can also check out Jimbo's Naturally; they have 4 location in North San Diego County. They have more stores opening up; I hear one is opening in Mission Valley. They have organic food in bulk.

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    8. We live in San Diego too and we LOVE Jimbos. They are opening one in Horton plaza in downtown this summer. They are fantastic and you will not believe the huge 100% organic produce section.

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  11. Anonymous11/30/2012

    Dear evilforestgnome- I am sorry to hear about your experience with Whole Foods Market in San Diego. I work at a WFM in Oregon and we encourage all kinds, sizes, shapes, weights of bulk containers! I would suggest calling and speaking with someone or asking for store leadership when you're in the store...hopefully with a nice conversation they can explain why- or better yet, change the policy! Good luck!

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  12. Anonymous11/30/2012

    Thanks for the recipe Bea! How long will a jar of pâté last in the fridge?

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    Replies
    1. Not sure. I cannot give you an accurate expiration date because pate does not linger in our household;) but I would say about a week once it's open? Use your instincts.

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  13. Anonymous12/01/2012

    will you please do another mini wardrobe fave? those are by far my favorite posts.

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  14. Yum, I love pate! I've never made it myself but my mother does it all the time and it tastes so much better than storebought. Much much cheaper too!

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  15. Claire B12/01/2012

    Wow, is it really that simple to make pate? I remember my grandfather spending half a day making his.... not sure what he put in it. Anyway I'm definitely trying this recipe next time I crave pate. Un grand merci pour la recette.

    Evilforestgnome: Do you have a Jimbo's in Hillcrest? I live in Escondido and find that they are more open that Sprouts when it comes to bringing your own containers. Haven't purchased any meat there though, just produce.

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    Replies
    1. It would take a few days for my grandparents to make pork pate, from the moment that they killed the pig until they processed the meat and canned it. But this recipe is just for one jar, made with what's conveniently available at the store ;)

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  16. Anonymous12/03/2012

    je découvre votre blog mais je lis mal l'anglais : une petite version french ? merci beaucoup & bonne journée Anne

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    Replies
    1. Bienvenue. On est en train de se pencher sur la question!

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    2. Anonymous12/04/2012

      Béatrice, je suis ds la même démarche que vous: je fabrique mes pdts de beauté , mes pdts ménagers,je décrois au maximum , je pars travailler à pied , je fais mon pain au levain , mes yaourts .... Le livre de Dominique Loreau sur l'Art de la Simplicité m'a bcp aidé à mettre les mots justes sur mes aspirations :) Je vous souhaite une belle vie Anne

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  17. Bea, totally unrelated, but are your kitchen counter tops marble?
    Thank you!

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  18. Its good to use plastic or glass containers again and again to do eco-friendly deeds.
    Reusable Containers

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  19. We used to eat this when I was a kid with ritz crackers and I loved it.

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  20. J'ai fait cette recette pour Noël. Délicieux! Merci!

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  21. Claire1/30/2013

    Did it! It was delicious. When we eat pâté at home, the children speak French (Youpi! despite the American accent of my 5 year old): Le pâté c'est bon avec les cornichons ! Same with crêpe, and fromage. Thank you.

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  22. Hi,
    I wanted to suggest what I do for butter. I buy mine in large baker's blocks at the grocery store, sold by clover organic. They are the size of four sticks, but only have one wrapper and no box! I freeze the block but always keep a thawed portion in the fridge. Also I love your blog, it has been a strong source of inspiration and encouragement for the past couple years!

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