Since adopting the Zero Waste lifestyle, my life and that of my family has completely changed, for the better. We not only feel happier, we lead more meaningful lives, based on experiences instead of stuff.
Today, my goal is to shatter pre-conceptions associated with the Zero Waste lifestyle and share what we have discovered about its incredible health, financial and time saving benefits. 

Zero Waste Recipes

These are recipes of items that I have not been able to find in bulk or as a refill, items that our household “can’t live without”. We have tried and tested many recipes but these are the ones that have made the cut because they tasted good and worked best for us (which is why I won’t give the instructions on how to wash your hair with baking soda, or make cheese from kefir). Most importantly my recipes only require very few ingredients (all available in bulk, except for the yogurt starter) and are easy/quick to make. Every home is different: you might not find the toothpowder to your liking, and can find more options (with more ingredients) online. Experiment, have fun and make quantities that last!


Bathroom

Tooth powder:
2 tb baking soda
1/8 ts white stevia powder
In a parmesan shaker
(for my shaker pictured, it takes 16tb baking soda, 1 ts stevia)

Hair Spray:
2-4 lemons sliced
Cover with water
Simmer for 30 min
Strain
Pour in spray bottle
Add 1tb rhum or vodka

Vitamin E balm:
1 tb beeswax
4 tb vitamin E (a friend gave me some but you can find sesame oil in bulk. It has a high concentration of vitamin E, and does not carry the strong smell)
Pour in small tin (got mine from Container Store)
Let cool
I use this balm on under eye, lips, hair tips, and home applications that call for Vaseline, like greasing up our attic ladder...

Lip/Cheeks Stain:
Cook beets, as you normally would, in a bit of water (eat the beets)
Reduce the left over juice until it thickens
Add a splash of vodka
Pour into a glass roll-on


Laundry/Cleaning

Ironing Starch:
1 pint water
1 tb cornstarch
In a spray bottle

Drain Cleaner:
¼ c. baking soda in your drain
Followed by ½ c. white vinegar

Multi Purpose Cleaner:
1 ½ ts. castile soap (optional, for scent)
3 ts. white vinegar
4 c. water
In a spray bottle.


Kitchen
Mustard:
Soak ¾ c. yellow mustard seeds in ¾ c. white vinegar + ½ c. white wine, in a canning jar
Blend (immersion blender) with salt and 2 ts honey
Add water to reach your preferred consistency

Vanilla Extract:
Combine 2 vanilla beans chopped, ½ c. brandy, ¼ water
Steep for 3 days
Strain
Pour in glass bottle

Hot Sauce:
Blend ½ c. chiles (serrano or jalapeno), 2/3 c. vinegar, 1 ¾ ts salt
Steep for 3 days
Strain
Pour in glass bottle

Soymilk:
Soak 2 c. soy beans overnight
Drain
Blend (immersion blender) with 12 c. water
Strain and squeeze in handkerchief into a large pot
Add sugar and vanilla to taste
Bring to a boil
Boil for 10min
Let cool
Pour in a glass (Straus Creamery) milk bottle
Lasts a week

I was making soy milk for my older son only, who does not like the taste of regular milk, but as I noticed his use decreasing over the last few months, he finally told me that he had had enough of it and did not want it anymore... He added that it would save me time... what a sweet mama's boy.

Yogurt (you need a thermometer):
Heat oven to 100-150, turn light on
Heat 4 c. milk on the stove to 185F
Pour milk in a French or mason canning jar
Cool milk to 110F
Add yogurt starter or ¼ c. yogurt that you already have
Put in oven, turn oven off, keep light on (to keep temp at 110F)
(to save energy, you can also drop the jar in a 110F water bath in a closed pressure cooker)
Wait 4-6 hrs
Refrigerate

(You can also make cheese from your yogurt, by hanging it in a handkerchief and letting it drain... it's a lot of milk for a tiny bit of soft cheese though, not economical when you use Straus Creamery milk)

I am not making yogurt on a regular basis anymore either, I can't seem to get past the starter's packaging and am hanging onto my last packet. I hope to find yogurt starter in bulk soon!

On my way to make more hot sauce! (my bottle looks pretty low on the picture...)

104 comments:

  1. Great information ! Thanks for sharing

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  2. These recipes are really helpful! Some I have already been using, but not all. I really appreciate your ideas.

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  3. I just dropped by to say "hi" from across the pond. I love your site and your recipes, especially the beetroot one. I'm going to give that one a go.

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  4. I make yogurt and have taken a batch and frozen it in ice cube trays (or 1-2 T per dollop). I use 1-2 cubes per 4c milk and it always sets up just fine. I have a yogurt maker- it takes 7 hours.

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  5. Thanks bridgmanpottery: I can use your tip to make my last yogurt packet last longer... I need to find a stainless ice cube tray 1st though. Arg! they're is always something ;)

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  6. For the yogurt starter, all you need is a few tablespoons of your last batch. I have done this for several batches and it sets just fine. No need to freeze, just use the last bit in the bottom of your last jar.

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  7. With using a few tablespoons from the last batch each time I make yogurt, the starter weakens overtime. However the freezing would allow me to "separate" my last packet of starter into many strong starters (each batch being reusable themselves). It seems that I'll go further with the one packet by freezing.

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  8. Bea, I've seen old metal ice cube trays in antique/junk stores. alternately, you can freeze individual plops of the yogurt on a cookie sheet and store them in one of your bigger le parfait jars.

    very inspiring blog.

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  9. I made Vitamin E balm using 1 TB of beeswax and 4 TB of sesame oil. It was extremely easy to make and is working well (I have very dry and sensitive skin). Thanks for the easy, effective recipe.

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  10. bridgmanpottery: the ice trays that I have found at thrift shops have been aluminum. Since I do not want to use aluminum for food type items, I am going to test one of my glasses in the freezer before I buy a stainless one from an online store. Cross your fingers!

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  11. Bea I LOVE your site, it's wonderful to have such usable ideas. The focus in our home has been more on healthy eating, but now your blog has really got us making changes.
    I just wanted to stick up for Kefir cheese because I make it all the time and love it. The whey that drains out of the yogurt (or kefir) when you make cheese can be used for making ginger ale and other fizzy drinks. I love real ginger ale, but because of your blog I hate buying all those bottles and cans, sooo... I'll start using my whey to make it. Nourishing Tradition's by Sally Fallon has a good recipe for it, haven't tried it yet though.
    Thanks again for all the great ideas.

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  12. No... Thank you for your tip, Holly! did not know about the ginger ale possibilities. I might have to revive my dried kefir grains afterall :)

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  13. I could not be bothered to make yogurt anymore after finding and getting some kefir grains. All you do is take a clean jar, put in some milk even cold straight from the fridge. You then put in the living kefir grains and then cover and let it sit 24 hours or 48 hours depending on the temperature of your house. Then pour through a sieve into another container, rinse the grains in water to remove any curd and repeat the process all over again.

    Kefir has so many more bacteria types in it than just the one or two commercial yogurt starters or even commercial kefir starter powders do.

    Couldn't be easier and the health benefits are more than with yogurt or yogurt like drinks, probiotics, etc.

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  14. Thanks for your input Peter. We also used kefir grains (bought them on Ebay) but gave them up after 9 months. I love the taste of its yogurt and that of the cheese we made from it, but I did find it high maintenance and with Straus milk, it became too expensive to keep the kefir grains alive (especially when my family was not crazy about it). If I lived on my own, I would definetely get them going again though!

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  15. Anonymous7/31/2010

    Stainless Steel Ice Cube Tray is at http://lifewithoutplastic.com/boutique/stainless-steel-cube-tray-p-409.html

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  16. Hi Bea,
    I live in Portugal, and I´m trying to get the track to the zero wast life!
    I couldn't find the castile soup here, but I found a Marseille soap, which is made with olive oil. But it's a regular BAR soap.
    How do you suggest to make your Multi Purpose Cleaner using this soap?
    And one more question about this recipe, what means "c." wen you are talking about the water amount?
    I´m gonna use this kind of cleaner on the bathtub and on my kitchen floor, is this a correct use?
    Thank you very much for the help!!! And sorry for the silly questions, I´m a beginner!!!
    XOXO
    Nina

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  17. Hi ninapicnic:
    -Castile soap is very much like marseille soap (I grew up 45min away from Marseille). In order to substitute, you would have to grate some of the solid soap in a small bowl of hot water and add it to the rest of the ingredients.
    -c. means cup. In the US, the common cooking measurement is cups (1/4 cup, 1/2 cup, 3/4 cup...). in a measuring cup, 1cup=250ml.
    -you can use the cleaner pretty much everywhere in the house. But if you bathtub needs a scrubbing, use baking soda.
    I hope this helps! Good luck.

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  18. Hi Bea. Just wondering if you recommend a particular immersion blender? Love your site!

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  19. Heidi: Please refer to the comments of Zero Waste Kitchen for your answer. Thanks.

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  20. Hi Bea, I just read the Sunset article about your zero waste home. Your blog is fantastic, and tips and recipes super handy. Thank you!

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  21. Anonymous1/08/2011

    great info thank you!!

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  22. Anonymous1/08/2011

    for the toothpaste. is the white stevia your talking about the sugar substitute? or it that a diff. type of stevia

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  23. Anonymous1/09/2011

    Love what you are doing and try to move towards the same goal one step at a time. Have wanted to rid my life of plastic freezer bags and am curious about freezing the bread in the freezer. What about freezer burn, is that not a reality?

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  24. I have not experienced freezer burns when frezing bread in the pillowcase, but every freezer might be different. Just give it a try!

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  25. Yes, stevia is a plant, better known as a sugar substitute.

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  26. I'm so glad I found your site! What fantastic ideas :)

    A note on the yogurt (which I make in a big batch weekly during the summer) -- if you make yogurt cheese or greek-style yogurt by straining it, you can save the whey and use it as a milk, buttermilk, or water substitute in almost any recipe. I use it for pancakes, mashed potatoes, mac n cheese, and as a starter for bread. They all come out with an amazing flavor.

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  27. Anonymous2/14/2011

    I saw you on tv this morning, and what you are doing is wonderful.

    I have never heard of a menstrual cup. I am guessing I can buy one at the drug store?

    I am going to try these zero waste ideas.

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  28. This may seem unnecessary, but I am actually interested in knowing where you purchased your specific parmesan shaker for the tooth powder. I like that it can slide closed and only opens one section at a time. If you have a moment to point me in the right direction it would be much appreciated!

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  29. Elise: please visit the store for recommendations.

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  30. Anonymous2/16/2011

    Bea,
    I finally have both beeswax ("beeswax beads") and vitamin E oil to make the balm. Do I heat it on the stove until the beeswax liquifies, then add the oil?

    Many thanks

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  31. Anonymous: about the cup. You can find it in Health food stores and this blog's store.

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  32. about the beet lip stain recipe, what is the vodka for? Does it act as a preservative? Is there something else I could use that would be effective? I would like to do this but would like it to be a sustainable practice and buying alcohol isn't an option.

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  33. Anonymous2/21/2011

    Wow! All incredible ideas! Thank you for sharing your passion with us! My only suggestion is to avoid soy. Most all soy is GMO and is also an estrogen modifier. Not the best choice for hormonal issues, especially for male developmental years. You can make a better "milk" with almonds or hemp seeds.

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  34. Robyn: the vodka is used as a preservative. and that's what I had on hand when I made the stain. Any other alcohol laying around in your liquor cabinet, might just as well work.

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  35. Anonymous3/06/2011

    Just checking in to see if you know that you can use some of your own homemade yogurt as starter for the next batch. I use a yogurt maker and reusable glass jars that contain approximately 1/2 cup each. I use a heaping teaspoon of yogurt from my last batch for each jar. I would guess that this would equal @ 1/4 cup of yogurt for 4 cups of milk or a quart. If your family finds homemade yogurt less palatable than the store-bought kind, you might try portioning out the batch into smaller containers for a smoother and more consistent product. Love your blog!

    Carol

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  36. Hi - How long does the beetroot cheek stain last? Thanks!

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  37. Jordan3/11/2011

    Bea, can you post the recipe that you use for the laundry detergent? I like the idea of a powder detergent. Most of the ones I find online are for gel detergents. I liked the way your detergent looked on the yahoo! video (looked like commercial detergent). Thanks! I'm making the switch too!

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  38. Jordan: I do not make my own laundry detergent. When I did, I was ready to give up the green movement!... Refer to Zero Waste Laundry article for more on this.

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  39. The beetroot stain lasts a few weeks, probably longer if kept in a cold place.

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  40. Anonymous3/19/2011

    Hi Bea - And how long does your mustard recipe last? I finally found some mustard seed in bulk. So excited!

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  41. Anonymous3/26/2011

    Bea, I really love your idea, and I had been voting for you almost every day for you to win the Green Awards. I support your concept of been zero waste and besides minimalist. I am the same way, but to keep this idea in a family of five is quite a challenge, but I thing with patience and perseverence we will get there.

    Thank you for the advice. I hope soon you will write a ebook that I can download in my nook to read.

    Sincerely

    Diana

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  42. I tried the tooth powder but my husband wouldn't use it so I just made toothpaste using this recipe:
    2 tablespoons coconut oil
    3 tablespoons baking soda
    2 packets Stevia
    25 drops peppermint oil
    5 drops spearmint oil
    Not bad and my husband will use it.

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous3/29/2012

      Thank you so much for the recipe. I tried it and my husband loved it. He says it's better than the one we use to buy. Thanks again!

      Best,
      Ingrid

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  43. I'd love for you to post your bacon grease soap recipe.

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  44. slushygirl: Please post Zero Waste or mostly Zero Waste recipes only. Thanks!

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  45. Anonymous4/06/2011

    I'm confused...what is NOT zero waste about Slushygirl's recipe?

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  46. Anonymous: Is this a trick question? or maybe you did not look closely at the ingredients (packets of stevia) or maybe I have not been lucky enough to yet find coconut oil, peppermint oil or spearmint oil in bulk... In which case, I think the community would like to know where you were able to find them. Please share!

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    1. You can find bulk coconut oil (1 & 5 gallons) and essential oils (4, 8, & 16 oz bottles) at mountainroseherbs.com. They are sent in the mail which means there is packaging, but this can be reused and their packaging & shipping materials are sustainable. Here are 2 quotes from their website about these items: " We currently utilize recycled materials in the production and packaging of our products and this includes the finished products we offer to all of our customers. Our bulk carrier oils are packaged in plastic bottles made from 100% recycled plastic, the bottles used for our line of herbal capsules were manufactured from 100% recycled plastic resin, the tins for our balms are made from raw material which has at least 25% recycled metal, the kraft bags used to package our teas are composed of recycled paperboard, the labels used on our products are printed with 100% post consumer waste paper, and too many others to list!" "We use recycled post-consumer newsprint to fill the voids of your parcel, the boxes we use for shipping your order are made from 100% post-consumer corrugation material, the plastic bubble wrap we use to cushion merchandise during transit is manufactured from 100% post-cosumer plastic resin, and for our larger customers that order pallet quantities, you will notice that the stretch film for your shipment is a green hue and this is because it is manufactured from a plant based resin and is 100% bio-compostable! The paper used for inserts, invoices, brochures, etc., is always made from 100% post-consumer recycled paper, and the peanuts which are occasionally used in our parcels are salvaged and cleaned from other companies and individuals."

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  47. Anonymous4/10/2011

    Thanks Bea for all the info. I know it must get tedious holding our hands but would you please post what you use the multi purpose cleaner for. I would love to eliminate all harmful cleaners from my house. Also on a side note, you mentioned expanding on simplifying things, I would love to read that. Somewhere you mentioned we should love all the items we use, I donated my everyday dishes and am now using my grandmothers dishes I had stored for that "special occasion". Now everyday is a special occasion. I also use her cut glass dish as a butter dish. I smile everyday. My father always said "the more things you own, the more things own you".

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    1. Anonymous3/22/2012

      Be careful using old or antique dinnerware. Many older items contain lead or lead based paint.

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  48. Melissa4/11/2011

    Hi,

    I tried making the beet lip stain, but wasn't sure how to reduce the beet water to get it thick. Right now it's watery. Any tips for reducing it? How thick should it get?

    Thanks!
    Melissa

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  49. Anonymous, re: cleaner. Please refer to Zero Waste Cleaning.

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  50. Thank you so much for all of your recipes and tips, Bea...I am curious. Where do you get your GLASS JARS???? I want to go and buy a whole bunch. I am very inspired. I read your article, "Waste Not," in the Bay Area Parent magazine.

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  51. Sandra4/15/2011

    Bea, I think it would be helpful if you clarified the definition of a Zero Waste recipe in this post. For those of us with fewer bulk options available, I think the information would help us choose better alternatives.

    I understand why you do not consider the toothpaste recipe posted in the comments above to be zero waste. Using 5 packaged products (even if they come in paper or glass containers) to make one toothpaste ends up producing more waste overall than purchasing a single tube of toothpaste (even if it comes in a plastic tube).

    Confusion over what is less wasteful occurs when you don't have access to bulk and are trying to consider the alternatives. At the moment, I cannot find either baking soda or stevia in bulk, so I have been using a toothpaste packaged in an aluminum tube, which I feel is more recyclable than plastic. But I wonder if this is a better choice than buying a paper box of baking soda and paper 'packets' of stevia. What are your thoughts?

    Thanks for your help.

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  52. Bea: I have read that mixing castile soap and vinegar can produce an undesirable product (oily globs that don't go away). Have you found this with your cleaner?

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  53. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  54. Sandra4/19/2011

    Hi, Bea. I'd like to clarify my own comments above:) I was hoping you could emphasize somewhere in the post that the recipes should be made from ingredients you found in bulk. Otherwise you'll just end up producing more packaging waste by buying three containers of ingredients in order to replace one product. Thanks.

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  55. Anonymous4/19/2011

    Just a note! According to the Dr. Bronners website, you are not supposed to mix vinegar and castile soaps. They actually cancel each other out and make an ineffective cleanser! I have been doing this for over 9 years and always wondered why it was so chunky! I now omit the vinegar and it works great! I will polish with vinegar after if necessary! I love your blog, keep it up!

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  56. Sandra: If I did not have bulk, I would choose a recipe with fewer ingredients, or find a toothpaste in a metal tube.
    The ingredients above, seem to create more waste than a metal tube and the amount of ingredients needed is not sustainable in the long term.
    Reducing/Simplifying (2-3 ingerdients) is key to sticking to Zero Waste long term. If a recipe calls for too many ingredients, you'll eventually won't go thru the trouble of making it and will give it up. For example, I could make makeup, but the amount of ingredients and time needed is not sustainable in the long term. Zero Waste for us, is not a temporary project but a lifestyle, I home-make what I can see myself making for the rest of my life.

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  57. Sandra: the Intro does mention bulk buying for the ingredients.

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  58. Laurel and Anonymous: Castile soap is mainly used for scent, and is optional (I added that mention to the post, thanks for pointing that out). It does clump up but does not interfere with the spray. Since I do not buy essential oils, I find castile soap handy for that purpose, since I already have it on hand for the 1000 other uses around the house ;)

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  59. Sandra4/23/2011

    Thanks for your response, Bea. I think I have been focusing so much on eliminating plastic packaging that I forgot to consider the long term sustainability of my decisions.

    Perhaps Slushygirl's recipe could be shortened to include only the baking soda and coconut oil. You can use the baking soda for multiple cleaning/baking purposes, and the coconut oil jars could be reused to store bulk pantry items.

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  60. Hi Bea,
    What a great blog! I was just wondering how long the mustard and hot sauce last. Thanks.
    Blessings on your day!

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  61. Grace: indefinitely or as long as condiments/pickles since the perserving ingredient is vinegar.

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  62. Hi Bea, Thank you for all your ideas. I reference your site frequently.

    Do you have a recipe for shampoo?

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  63. uttama5/10/2011

    Bea,
    Does stevia cause cavities seeing that it is a sweetener? Why not just use baking soda? Is the stevia just for flavor? Has anyone talked to a dentist/done research regarding baking soda's teeth cleaning properties? I'm just wondering if it is equally effective/worse/better at cleaning teeth and preventing cavities as standard toothpaste?
    Thanks!

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  64. Uttama: Stevia is for taste (baking soda is salty, the stevia makes it a pleasant experience). Our dentists have told us that using toothpowder is fine -as long as you don't scrub forcefully with it of course ;). Toothpowder aid at brushing but is not needed, it is the act of brushing that is most important.

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  65. Anonymous5/25/2011

    Wow, I am new to your blog and I am hooked. Question about your lip stain, LOVE, but about how long should that last, could it go rancid?

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  66. Bea, try looking for a stainless steel I've cube tray at an antique store. I have seen several there (santa cruz)

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  67. Anonymous6/09/2011

    Bea-
    I read to make deodorant you mix baking soda and water. What ratio do you use? Thanks for all the tips!

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  68. Straight baking soda work best (but marks white).

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    1. Anonymous6/15/2012

      baking soda doesn't work for everyone for me not at all.

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    2. I use alun and it works great. In a shop they were selling it without packaging. Lasts for ever too.

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  69. Anonymous6/23/2011

    I'm writing from the Fraser Valley and noted the comments about stevia packets. Stevia is incredibly easy to grow in our area. One plant produces a constant supply over the summer for myself and 2 kids.At the end of the season you can dry remaining leaves. You can also make your own stevia extract using distilled water. The plants do not like the cold weather however and must be brought inside over our winters..............mommaLori

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  70. Bea, If you save enough yogurt from your batch to fit into a small jam jar each time you make yogurt you will have a replenishing starter.

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  71. Anonymous6/27/2011

    In the lip/cheek stain how do you reduce the liquid until it thickens. I don;t understand that step.

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  72. Anonymous7/05/2011

    Hi there! Can you post a good recipe for a bronzer, any additions besides coco powder??

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  73. I am loving your site! I too have been on a new life adventure. For me, it has been getting back to traditional foods. I make (almost) everything from scratch in my kitchen including condiments such as mustard, ketchup, mayo. I do love making my own yogurt, but since I buy raw milk, it isn't cheap to do it often. I make my mustard using kombucha instead of vinegar for it's probiotic qualities. TO make hot sauce I ferment peppers in whey, also adds probiotics to your food!

    It's funny how you've mentioned not liking baking soda for your hair, because I just started that and I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE it. I'll never buy shampoo again. I guess my hair just responded to it. So, hopefully people don't get turned off by trying it. I can see how it may not work for everyone, but my hair hasn't looked or felt better.

    Also, I was really surprised you buy toilet paper instead of using washable cloths. I have been considering switching to washable cloths and was wondering what your reasoning was for not doing that?

    Anyway, I just wanted to let you know that you have really been a huge inspiration to me. To incorporate some of what you have learned, along with the traditional/real foods journey I've been taking with the Weston A. Price Foundation, my life is really shifting. I never noticed how much garbage was in my house until you opened my eyes! Thank you so much for that.

    Amanda from:
    http://thefrickingchicken.blogspot.com and
    http://txtwins.blogspot.com

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  74. Susan d8/09/2011

    Thanks so much for all of the great ideas. Just wondering what you think is the best way to sanitize the toilet and the kitchen sink. These are the two areas where I am still tempted to use regular cleaners.

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  75. Bea I read somewhere that you make/preserve your own anchovies. Is it easy? I would love a tutorial on how it's done....what about capers? Have you ever tried making/pickling your own?

    Best wishes
    Sonja

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  76. Susan D: I use vinegar for those areas and feel confortable with my cleanliness ;)

    Sonja: great idea for a future post, re: anchovies, plus I need to make some. Have not yet tried capers but do not need to, since I can find them in bulk (for simplifying reasons, I like to make only what I cannot find in bulk).

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  77. This blog is amazing, I love it! I'm from Mexico, I'm definitely gonna start making some changes at my home, thanks a lot!

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  78. Regarding mixing Dr Bronner and vinegar. I make my own dish soap. 1st batch was great, 2nd batch looked like water with clumps and didn't clean anything. The difference was that I heated the 2nd time, bad idea. When its not heated, it appears cloudy but cleans well, leaves dishes "sqeaky" clean. I think the vinegar is in there to help rinse any residue
    Bea - I have been reading your blog for a few months. You are an inspiration and great motivations. I'm trying, slowly but trying.

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  79. Anonymous9/07/2011

    Can I ask where you got the spray bottle that you use for your multi purpose cleaner? Thank you!

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  80. AD: For dish soap, we use straight Dr Bronner's. The cleaner described above is for house cleaning (kitchen, bathroom...) The castile soap in it is optional, it is the vinegar that does the job.

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  81. Anonymous: this spray bottle is from the Container Store and I have some in the blog's store.

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  82. Baking soda if used daily damages the tooth enamel. Do you think it is a wise choice for your family and you? Its good to use baking soda once or twice a week to remove stains/whiten teeth, not everyday. Due to its abrasive nature, baking soda can destroy the tooth enamel.

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  83. Thanks Pallo, for showing concern for our teeth! ;)
    I use it once a day with a moderate amount(as with everything else) of fine bulk baking soda(diff coarseness available on the market). I tend to agree with the dentists that say that it is the act of brushing, not what's on the toothbrush that matters.

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  84. Anonymous1/09/2012

    Love your ideas Bea. Some I already do.
    I think I read in People that you make your own eye liner. Do you have a recipe for eyeliner? I have been searching for an alternative.

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  85. I make yogurt in my crock pot with some leftover yogurt from the first batch. You can do the same with buttermilk, leaving at at room temp to culture.

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  86. Anonymous1/17/2012

    you can save a bit of yogurt from one batch to use in your next batch!! saves you the cost/packaging of starter! Middle Eastern women do this all the time :)

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous6/15/2012

      I wonder if the same hold true with the buttermilk. I purchased 6 tiny packets but the recipe in Nourishing Traditions calls for 1/2 cup for 1 quart of buttermilk!

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  87. Anonymous1/18/2012

    I use Baking soda and ACV rinse too! I LOVE using egg yolks occasionally... 2 yolks applied to roots then left to sit a few minutes. Rinse with cold water and voila, shiny beautiful hair! Rinse well or you will smell of eggs ;)

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  88. Anonymous1/30/2012

    Hi There-What an inspiration!

    I have a few things that may help-

    Miswak sticks- easily available in Middle Eastern stores- are a compostable toothbrush alternative, additionally, they require no toothpaste. (Better still- research the trees that have been used traditionally in your region and source them out- perhaps plant one in your yard).

    We use these, along with traditional toothbrushes, home made tooth soap, and tooth powder once a week or so for whitening.

    Soap nuts and yucca root both make great shampoo that is locally grown/available- my daughters and I have very long hair and it works very well. (Again- you can plant yucca in your garden, and there are native variants on the soap nut in America- find a source near you- or plant your own in your yard).

    A great alternative to toilet paper is cloth which is washable and reusable.
    If you use a natural soap- Castile, yucca, soap nut, etc- to wash that is even better!

    Also- to AD, you should not mix Castile and vinegar. The vinegar unsaponifies the fats in the soap- resulting in clumps- also the mix neutralizes the positive benefits of both items.
    Try washing in Castile soap- then doing a rinse in a sink of water and vinegar- this should cut through the residue left by the natural soap- and leave a squeaky clean dish.
    Also, you can follow your Castile soap hair washing with an acid for the same effect :)

    This will run true with any Castile (base) and acid mix.

    I hope that helps!

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  89. Anonymous3/03/2012

    Bea,

    I have had great success using just baking soda to wash my clothes. I use about 1 tablespoon for normal laundry. 2 tablespoons for really dirty or stinky laundry(dog blankets). I just pre scrub any serious food stains.

    I have been making my own olive oil/veggie oil soap for years. I am curious if there is a reason you do not make your own soap?

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    Replies
    1. Maybe it depends on the washer, but I have had no luck washing with baking soda only. Maybe it's because I did not prescrub (load of family of four)as you do.
      Re: soap, I choose not to complicate my life making something that I can buy local and unpackaged (it would be unsustainable for my family in the long run). As I have mentioned before, I choose to make the things that I cannot find unpackaged/bulk. Not that I have not tried making soap in the past. I made it with bacon grease, because I happened to have some soda ash. If you do have a recipe for soap making made from ingredients that you can find in bulk and that do not require homemaking soda ash;), please, please share!

      Delete
  90. Anonymous3/24/2012

    my dad makes his own soap u should to!

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  91. Anonymous3/28/2012

    Hi Bea,
    I was wondering if you had any tips on laundry stains? White kitchen towels to be specific. We've used kitchen towels in place of paper towels for years, but can never get them completely stain free
    (naturally).

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  92. Use 2 tablespoons of your last batch of yoghurt as your starter for your new batch. That's what I do and my yoghurt is now as thick and creamy as the shop bought ones full of artificial thickeners.

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    Replies
    1. That's what I do too, and it works fantastic.

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  93. can you please add your mascara recipe! Thanks :)

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  94. This is very Good recipe. Keep going on with your effort to write more posts.
    for more french toast recipe visit: http://frenchtoastrecipe9.com here many french toast ideas...

    ReplyDelete
  95. Anonymous1/08/2013

    I read the comment about toothbrushes...there are compostable toothbrushes out there. I do not represent these guys just providing the info. http://worldcentric.org/biocompostables/toothbrushes
    http://environmentaltoothbrush.com.au/

    ReplyDelete